Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) About Rags

1 - What is the most common rag used by mechanics ?
2 -
What is the most common rag used by auto body workers ?
3 -
What is the most common rag used by elevator mechanics ?
4 -
What is the most common rag used by contract cleaners ?
5 -
What is the most common rag used by furniture finishers ?
6 -
How do rags come packed ?
7 -
Why do my friends pay less for a rag?
8 -
Where do rags come from?
9 -
What is fleece, polo and balbriggan ?
10-
What rag is the most absorbent ?
11-
How do I "Get on the Ball" and order from Ball Trading ?


What is the most common rag used by mechanics ?

There is no one answer when it comes to the "best" rag for a particular job. Personal preference accounts for a lot. Different trades prefer different types of rags for various reasons. Based on sales history, Ball Trading has found that mechanics commonly use any type of cotton rag that is tough enough to stand up to use on metal parts, such as soft denim, fleece or medium color. Auto body workers seem to prefer a rag soft enough not to scratch, such as polo, flannel or balbriggan. Oil companies use corduroy, fleece or polo. Elevator mechanics use fleece or polo. Contract cleaners use white terry, balbriggan and sheets. Furniture finishers use cheesecloth and balbriggan.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


What is the most common rag used by auto body workers?

There is no one answer when it comes to the "best" rag for a particular job. Personal preference accounts for a lot. Different trades prefer different types of rags for various reasons. Based on sales history, Ball Trading has found that mechanics commonly use any type of cotton rag that is tough enough to stand up to use on metal parts, such as soft denim, fleece or medium color. Auto body workers seem to prefer a rag soft enough not to scratch, such as polo, flannel or balbriggan. Oil companies use corduroy, fleece or polo. Elevator mechanics use fleece or polo. Contract cleaners use white terry, balbriggan and sheets. Furniture finishers use cheesecloth and balbriggan.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


What is the most common rag used by elevator mechanics ?

There is no one answer when it comes to the "best" rag for a particular job. Personal preference accounts for a lot. Different trades prefer different types of rags for various reasons. Based on sales history, Ball Trading has found that mechanics commonly use any type of cotton rag that is tough enough to stand up to use on metal parts, such as soft denim, fleece or medium color. Auto body workers seem to prefer a rag soft enough not to scratch, such as polo, flannel or balbriggan. Oil companies use corduroy, fleece or polo. Elevator mechanics use fleece or polo. Contract cleaners use white terry, balbriggan and sheets. Furniture finishers use cheesecloth and balbriggan.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


What is the most common rag used by contract cleaners?

There is no one answer when it comes to the "best" rag for a particular job. Personal preference accounts for a lot. Different trades prefer different types of rags for various reasons. Based on sales history, Ball Trading has found that mechanics commonly use any type of cotton rag that is tough enough to stand up to use on metal parts, such as soft denim, fleece or medium color. Auto body workers seem to prefer a rag soft enough not to scratch, such as polo, flannel or balbriggan. Oil companies use corduroy, fleece or polo. Elevator mechanics use fleece or polo. Contract cleaners use white terry, balbriggan and sheets. Furniture finishers use cheesecloth and balbriggan.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


What is the most common rag used by furniture finishers?

There is no one answer when it comes to the "best" rag for a particular job. Personal preference accounts for a lot. Different trades prefer different types of rags for various reasons. Based on sales history, Ball Trading has found that mechanics commonly use any type of cotton rag that is tough enough to stand up to use on metal parts, such as soft denim, fleece or medium color. Auto body workers seem to prefer a rag soft enough not to scratch, such as polo, flannel or balbriggan. Oil companies use corduroy, fleece or polo. Elevator mechanics use fleece or polo. Contract cleaners use white terry, balbriggan and sheets. Furniture finishers use cheesecloth and balbriggan.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


How do rags come packed?

We pack our rags in 5 lb, 10 lb, 25 lb and 50 lb boxes or in 100 - 1000 lb bales.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


How come my friend pays less for a rag ?

There are many different types of rags ranging from inexpensive to costly. Unfortunately, many rags look similar. You must make sure that you are comparing equal items and weights to insure a proper comparison. The best way is to check quality and weight with your professional rag man. You may find that all is not as it appears to be.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


Where do rags come from?

Rags come indirectly from Goodwill, The Salvation Army, etc. Boxes are collected and sold to graders who sort out good clothing which are exported or sold as "vintage". The product which is not used, is sold as uncut rags. We purchase the "uncut rags" in thousand pound bales. At Ball Trading, the uncut rags are first put through our quality control department, then cut and sort and finally packaged in boxes or bales. All rags are cleaned before they arrive at Ball Trading, although at times re-washing in required to meet our quality control standards.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


What is fleece, Polo & Balbriggan?

These and others are commonly used names for rags. The definations are as follows:

Fleece Sweatshirt
Polo T Shirt
Balbriggan White T Shirt
Cheesecloth A loosly woven, lint-free wiper which is used for dusting and polishing
Turk and Terry Cut up Terry robes and towels
Medium Color or #3 Color Cut up medium weight cotton pants and shirts
Ganzi Underwear

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page


What rag is the most absorbent?

There are many absorbent rags. Generally speaking, 100 % cotton is the most absorbent, depending on the state of the material and the liquid that you are absorbing. New cotton often has sizing on it, a chemical used to protect fabric during shipping. This process prevents the material from absorbing liquids. Small amounts of polyester helps cotton to absorb faster by opening up the weave and allowing liquids to enter. Additionally, polyester is a petroleum based fiber which means that it will absorb petroleum based liquids, such as oil.

Back to FAQ's

Return to Ball Trading Home Page

Ball Trading
266 Freeman St., Brooklyn, NY 11222
1-(800) 521-RAGS
Fax: (718) 349-2939

home
| about us | products | faq's | email
terms & conditions | ordering | guest book

 

Click Here!